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Austrian Sourdough

Austrian Sourdough

Austrian Sourdough

I have my Austrian Sourdough Starter going and made up a batch of Austrian Sourdough bread. This is what I did:

In the late afternoon around 4:00pm I made up a batch of dough in my mixer using:

  • 1 lb 12 oz of 166% Austrian Sourdough Starter
  • 18 oz water
  • 6 oz evaporated milk
  • 3 lbs 3 oz of bread flour
  • 1.2 oz salt (added after autolyse)

I did the usual of mixing up the dough just enough to incorporate all of the ingredients. Then I let the dough rest for 20 minutes (autolyse). After Autolyse was over, I added the salt. Then I mixed the dough for about one more minute. I let the dough bulk ferment and turned the dough a few times during the ferment (either fold the dough or turn it in the mixer a few turns). The dough fermented for six hours and then I shaped the dough into loaves. The dough was bubbly, stretchy and very nice. The gluten was well developed. This was at 10 pm at night. I did the timing so late because I had to go to town in the morning and I knew I wouldn’t be back until around lunchtime. I didn’t want the dough to be ready to bake first thing in the morning or overfermented when I was ready to bake it. I actually did that last weekend and it was a disaster, so I wasn’t going to repeat it. Last weekend, I had dough ready to bake first thing in the morning, however, I forgot I had to go out in the morning. When I finally baked it, later in the afternoon, the dough was crepey feeling and over fermented. It baked up flat and the crumb was a tacky feeling fiasco [Yep, I still can bake a brick or two (three actually) 🙂 ] So…. don’t forget about timing!

 Anyway, for this batch, when I got home, the dough was ready to warm up, finish proofing and bake. It worked out great. You all know how to do the bake now, so I will just show you the pics of the loaves:

All three Austrian loaves

All three Austrian loaves

Side view

Side view

Lots of blisters

Lots of blisters

Crispy crust

Crispy crust

I will have to post the crumb pics later as I haven’t even cut into the bread yet! This is a very easy recipe and makes great bread. The dough will make up three loaves of a little over 2 lbs each and the hydration is 67%.
Here is the promised crumb picture:
Crumb

Crumb

The crust turned out crispy and the crumb was soft, chewy and has a great sour tang.
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14 Comments

  1. Molly Molly
    April 21, 2014    

    Thank you so much, I am so happy to see your response!
    Also, I saw someone else ask the question, but where did you get your Austrian Starter? (I am looking at CulturesforHealth.com but I also read somewhere else that where you buy makes all the difference. The same article said to ‘throw away those San Fran Sourdough Starters that you bought from your health stores…” So I’m curious if there are good merchants and not-so-good merchants for starters. From perusing your site i see that you probably did sell at one point from your store?)
    Thanks again, so much!

  2. Molly Molly
    April 16, 2014    

    Hi!
    I know this is a post from a long time ago! But when I googled Austrian Sourdough starter this page showed up. Looking at the picture of your bread combined with the fact that 1) hubby’s Austrian 2) just read using a long fermentation process helps in the breakdown of gluten making wheat tolerable for gluten-intolerant folks – 3 children of mine! I was wondering if you would help clarify what you did:
    started at 4pm – made the dough; after 6 hours of development, at 10pm (ish), you make 2 loaves out of the dough and refrigerated it in a 48F refrigerator. Then you took it out of the fridge at 10 am, let it come to room temperature and proof more before you put it in the 450 oven. If I understand it correctly thus far, about what time did you put the dough in the oven? In other words, after taking it out of the oven at 10am, how many hours did you let it sit before baking?
    Thanks SO MUCH! Baking for a glutenfree family has been such a challenge and quite expensive! So I would really appreciate baking a bread that doesn’t endup like a rock!

    • April 16, 2014    

      Hi Molly, final proofing of a loaf can take from one hour to five or more hours. It just depends upon when it is ready for the oven. Most of my loaves take around 2 – 3 hours to warm up and proof for the final rise (proof). So on average, 2 to 3 hours.

  3. TONYK TONYK
    August 26, 2012    

    I SHOULD HAVE READ THE COMMENTS SO I NOW KNOW TO COOL THE BREAD OVERNIGHT AT AROUND 45-48 * F — I AM ANXIOUS TO TRY THIS —

    TONYK

    • August 26, 2012    

      Yea, sorry, refrigerate overnight. You can use your regular refrigerator, just let it proof as long as it needs to.

  4. TONYK TONYK
    August 26, 2012    

    JUST GOT MY AUSTRIAN SOURDOUGH DRY STARTER AND IT IS NOW READY TO USE — LOOKING AT YOUR RECIPE — DO LEAVE THE DOUGH OUT ON THE COUNTER OR REFRIGERATE OVERNIGHT AND AT WHAT TEMPERATURE — YOU DID NOT SAY WHICH — IT LOOKS SO GOOD AND I AM READY TO TRY IT WITH YOUR HELP —

    TONYK

  5. Loren Loren
    May 25, 2010    

    Is there some place I can buy Austrian Sourdough Starter? My husbands mom was from Austria & recently passed away. It would mean alot to him if I could get some real Austrian starter!

  6. Bev Bev
    October 14, 2009    

    Question: does it make a difference what type of starter you use? I have one that has been with me for years, have no idea what type it is….just water/flour and 5 yrs old…so if you have a recipe using a certain type of starter i.e. Austrian vs. no name will the bread be the same??

    Bev

  7. October 14, 2009    

    Hi Bev, it does’nt matter what sourdough starter you use as long as you adjust for the different proofing times some starters can have. Teresa

  8. Marty Marty
    October 30, 2008    

    Also what temp did you set your oven? How long did you bake and did you mist the bread or use a water pan?

    Thanks

  9. Marty Marty
    October 30, 2008    

    What did you do witht he dough at 10pm – chill it? IF yes when did you set it out again?

  10. October 30, 2008    

    Hi Marty, I did put the dough in the refrigerator overnight, but I have a dedicated refrigerator at 48 degrees F. so it takes less time to warm up and proof in the morning, which I did at 10 am. I had the oven at 450 degrees ( whenever there is milk in the recipe) for 15 minutes, then turned down to 425 for 15 more minutes. I don’t bother with spraying anymore, I use the roasting lid method for steaming, which you can find if you do a search on my blog. Teresa

  11. October 4, 2008    

    HI Claire, the milk helps out with the nice colored crust, softens the crumb and encourages a better sour flavor. Teresa

  12. October 3, 2008    

    Beautiful loaves! The evaporated milk is an interesting ingredient. Did it noticeably change the flavor of the bread at all or effect the crust?

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