Category Archives for "Sourdough Baking"

San Francisco Style Bread with Northwest Starter

I haven’t been able to find the time to post the San Francisco Bread recipe, that I did earlier, to the Special Recipes folder yet. However, I did make the batch again using the same recipe. I decided to call the recipe San Francisco Sunrise Loaf. I came out really well again, I am very happy with how vigorous the dough turns out. I make up a mixture of the preferment the night before and it contains quite a bit of the resulting dough. I let it ferment overnight at room temperature and next morning it is so bubbly and smells terrific! I then put it into the mixer and added the rest of the ingredients. After making the dough and letting it bulk ferment for four hours the dough was doubled. It was a fast ferment. Here is the dough ready to shape:

bulk fermented

I divided the dough into three pieces and they weighed just over 2 lbs each:

divided dough

I then shaped the dough into loaves and put them into the couche:

couche

I let the dough proof for two hours this time instead of putting the loaves back into the refrigerator overnight like I did the first time. Then I baked the dough and got three nice loaves of sourdough:

baked dough

Here is loaf 1:

loaf 1

Loaf 2 :

loaf 2

Loaf 3 :

loaf 3

Here is a closeup of loaf 1 :

closeup

Here is the crumb:

crumb

crumb

This bread is really nice. It has an open fluffy crumb, wonderful flavor and the crust is very crispy, crusty. I am really liking this recipe. I especially like the way the dough is so invigorated by the preferment, the dough is so bubbly that it is somewhat hard to shape and get all of the big bubbles out of. I have had a great time eating slices with butter, it is soooooo good!

Australian Sourdough Super Tasty!

I mixed up a batch of sourdough using my Australian Sourdough Starter. This starter is my husband’s very favorite flavored starter besides the motherdough breads. I decided to use the Two Night Super Sour recipe but make it a one night instead. Well I ended up changing the flour in the recipe too.

In the evening:

  • I started with 2 cups of vigorous Australian Starter at 166% hydration (one cup flour to one cup water).
  • 2 cups of warm water
  • 1 cup Rye flour
  • 1 cup Whole Wheat flour
  • 2 cups Bread flour

I mixed this together as a sponge and let it set at room temperature overnight.

preferment

Next morning I added the prefermented mixture to my mixer and then added:

  • 1 cup warm water
  • 2 Tablespoons Oil
  • 5 teaspoons salt
  • 5 cups Bread flour (approximately)

I mixed the ingredients together and then let the dough rest for 15 minutes. I then kneaded the dough for an additional three minutes. The dough was doubled in 6 hours. I then had my daughter shape the loaves because I was very busy working on my car. I came back in to check on how she had done and realized something I had not considered before. I took it for granted that she knew how to shape loaves. She didn’t. She had basically gotten them into shape enough to put into the bannetons. The dough was flat in the baskets. Almost like it had been poured in. So I took out the dough and showed her how to shape the loaves so that the loaves had an outer skin of dough pulled around the outside and pinched together to form like a casing so that the bread could raise itself up and not turn out flat. If you don’t know how to do this, get some good books on baking which will show you. Jefferey Hamelman’s book on bread comes to mind, he has some great illustrations showing how to shape loaves.

Anyway, the loaves were reshaped and placed in banneton baskets:

shaped loaves

The shaped loaves raised for two hours and then slashed and baked:

slashed

The loaves were two large loaves weighing over two lbs each. They came out great!

Here is the first one:

first loaf

first loaf

Here is the crumb for the first loaf:

crumb

Here is the second loaf:

second loaf

This dough was easy to handle and not too sticky. The crust texture and color came out really great. The crumb is soft and open, and the flavor, as always, is unspeakably delicious. Australian Sourdough starter has an old world flavor that is hard to describe. It is also nicely sour.

Coaxing the Sour

Sometimes it seems as if you just can’t get the “sour” you want out of your starters. Yes, last Summer there was no problem, now it takes more work to get a good sour flavor. I am not sure why this is myself, I wonder if it is just the overall cooler temperatures of flour, starter, house and some people bake less, so the starter is left in the refrigerator most of the time. When I leave my motherdough starter in the refrigerator all of the time, it is a sweeter, fuller wheat flavor, definately not a more sour flavor.

Anyway, I have been working with the San Francisco starter and decided to try and coax the sour from it. I have been having moderately sour breads coming from this starter, and really great flavor and vigor. I started with a thicker preferment and fermented it for 18 hours keeping it at around 70 – 72 degrees. It looked like this:

preferment

I then mixed in te rest of the ingredients and let the dough ferment for four more hours and then shaped the dough:

shaped dough

Then I put the loaves into the refrigerator overnight for 12 hours. I couldn’t get too many pictures of the process as one of my sons was using my camera to make “Lego movies” and the camera was taped down! Anyway, next morning I took out the loaves and staggered them so they would bake at different times. I had five loaves at not quite 1.5 lbs each. Here are the results:

all five loaves

more loaves

more

more loaves

I sliced the one which didn’t get a good oven spring so we could try it out, it was the only one that came out a bit on the flattish side, here is the crumb:

crumb

I made the loaves on the small side so I could share with neighbors and friends as I have been getting a few hints lately 🙂  The bread came out with a terrific texture and already has a sharp taste even though the sour usually takes a couple of hours of cooling to develop completely. Although I feel the experiment with timing was successful, I do think it was at its limit. It did take a lot of high heat to get a good color with me keeping the oven at 450 longer than usual and I noticed that some of the crust was trying to tear in places, if you look closely you can see this. The dough was also more sticky than usual for the stage and hydration it was at. I think the gluten was right at the limit of trying to break down. I am thinking of doing the initial preferment at 12 hours at a warm temperature instead of 18 to see what the outcome would be. It seems to me that if you want to control the “sour” more, you might need a proofing box to help you keep the temperatures at a steady predictable warmth.

Pane Teresa Bread… Holey

Pane Teresa bread is so good! I love this bread. It is so unique… it is made differently than other breads. When you are done, you have a flat piece of dough…which transforms into a light fluffy loaf full of holes. It starts like this:

The motherdough that is used is very active and full of bubbles, if it isn’t, you won’t make good bread.

motherdough

Then you mix up the dough and let it set overnight, this is after mixing and before Autolyse:

preferment

This is after Autolyse and final mixing:

autolyse

The dough is refrigerated overnight and taken out the next day to warm up. It is then divided. I divided it into three pieces which weighed almost 2 lbs each.

divided dough

The dough is very wettish and hard to work with. Here is a closeup of the dough resting in preparation for shaping:

dough piece

The dough is then shaped and placed into Bannetons:

shaped loaves

They then proof for two hours. I put one of the loaves onto the cool porch to slow it down so all of the loaves wouldn’t be ready to bake at the same time. I also preheated the oven for a long time. The house was cold anyway, so I gave it a good two hours. I had layered two baking stones together for a lot of heat when the dough was placed on the stone.

Here is the first loaf, it didn’t reach the full potential that the next loaf did:

first loaf

The next loaf was larger although the same weight:

second loaf

Here are the two together:

two loaves together

Here is the third loaf, it turned out magnificent:

third loaf

This is the crumb from the second loaf:

crumb

Here are all of the loaves together:

all three loaves

The fragrance of this bread is heavenly! The crumb is soft and moist, the crust crisp and crackly. This is a really terrific loaf to bake up and always a surprise when it springs up in the oven and is so full of holes!

San Francisco Starter Experiments

Today I baked up a lower hydration dough using the San Francisco starter. I made a preferment from a motherdough of 80% hydration and let it set for 18 hours.

fermented dough

Then I added more flour and water to the batch and fermented it 6 more hours. After that I added the salt and rest of the flour and water and mixed it to a somewhat stiff (for me) dough. 

 stiff dough

 I let this set for two hours to raise and then put it into the refrigerator overnight. In the morning I let the dough warm up for two hours, shaped, proofed and baked.

first loaf

second loaf

Here is the first loaf:

first loaf baked

Here is the second loaf:

second loaf

both loaves

I used the roasting lid again to obtain a superior crust. It worked great! You could hear the crackle of the crust as it cooled.  The batch is a great success with  a terrific flavor and crisp crust. I served it with fresh butter and Turkey soup.

Here is a picture of the crumb which I took the next day. It is a lower hydration dough, so not too holey:

crumb

How About Lid Baking?… My Best SF Loaf Ever!

Well, here it is…. my best San Francisco Sourdough Bread ever!

Best Loaf

But I am getting ahead of my story!

It started like this… I took out my San Francisco Starter from the refrigerator and warmed it up and fed it for several days. My last blog was on trying a SF technique from the manager of the Boudin Bakery of San Francisco. I felt that the starter I prefermented was too warm for too long and so I decided to do a shorter preferment at 72 degrees. I kept my eye on it and when it was super bubbly and doubled, I went ahead and mixed up the dough. I then let the dough ferment for another four hours at which time I shaped the loaves and put them into the refrigerator overnight:

divided dough

shaped and in baskets

Next morning I took out the dough and let proof for two hours:

proofed

I had shaped one batard style loaf and two boules, they were two lbs 2 oz each.

After two hours proofing and one hour preheating my oven, I baked the first loaf:

first loaf

Crumb of first loaf

crumb

It came out pretty nice with a great crust and the crumb is nice too. Then I baked the second loaf which was a boule:

boule, loaf two

It came out okay, but I wanted a better color to the crust and bloom to the slashes. So I decided to take out my large roasting lid used for the Turkey pan and preheat it and use it to cover the last loaf:

Roasting lid

What was neat is that the bread was still slid onto the stone first, sprayed once, and then covered by the lid. I had heated up the oven to 500 degrees. As soon as I had placed the lid and shut the door, I turned down the oven to 425 degrees and left the lid on for 15 minutes. After the fifteen minutes were up, I took off the lid and turned the loaf around. It already looked awesome! Here it is all finished:

Best SF loaf

Side view

Well, anyway, as you can see, the color is terrific! The crust is also wonderfully chewy, and crispy. There are some drawbacks for me to baking in a pot, although I do like it. I must say, there are no drawbacks to the lid method, at least I haven’t found any yet! Having the loaf sit right on the stone and have the close steam generated by the lid covering it, has given me one terrific San Francisco Sourdough Loaf!

Here is the crumb:

crumb

 I will write up the technique and recipe and put it into the Special Recipe folder. Have a great day baking sourdough, I know I did!

A Tale of Two Sourdough Batches

I started with some sourdough starter which I kept at 72 degrees for 24 hours. I was following a technique I found on this site by Fernando Padilla, Plant Manager of Boudin Bakery in San Francisco, Ca.  http://www.exploratorium.edu/cooking/bread/recipe-berkeley.html

I was trying to obtain some results the same as Boudin Bakery, which as everyone knows is the most famous Sourdough Bakery probably in the world. Anyway, I then used the starter the next day and mixed up a batch of dough using the recipe provided. Except that I often like to hold out on using the salt until after the Autolyse or rest period for the dough. So I made up the dough and did Autolyse. The dough was looking great. It had that just perfect feel to it. I then added the salt and stirred down the dough with the mixer. Shock! Disbelief! Before my very eyes, the dough fell apart and turned into a gooey mess! I did not mix for more than four minutes, so I knew I hadn’t overmixed. I had made a batch earlier in the week that did the same thing right after I added the salt which was Morton Iodized Salt by the way. Now I don’t know if it was the salt or the prefermented stage of warming the starter or what actually caused this gooey mess. The earlier batch I had made was so bad it had to be thrown out. I decided to save the present ruined batch until tomorrow and see if I could do anything with it, so I refrigerated it. Next, I decided to try again, but instead of using a starter which was kept warm for 24 hours, I used my motherdough which I always feed and keep in the refrigerator at 80% hydration. I mixed up the batch using the exact same recipe, only using the motherdough and a different salt this time. I had some sea salt which is what I used. After autolyse, I added the salt and the dough was wonderful.The only problem was that I now had two large bowls of dough at around 6 lbs each as I had quadrupled the recipe. Tweleve pounds altogether, approximately.

two bowls of dough!

I left them out in the cold pantry which was around 40 degrees (yes, we have snow and ice laying out in the yard in Coastal Washington ! ) overnight. Next morning I brought the first ruined batch in to let it warm up. It was all full of bubbles and looked very active. Once it warmed up I poured it out and folded it a couple of times to see if I could build some strength in the gluten. It ended up feeling like a Ciabatta dough around 75 – 80 percent hydration.

Ciabatta dough ?

I kept it well covered in flour and decided to shape some Ciabatta loaves with it. What could I lose?  My other alternative was to throw it away anyway! So I shaped it like Ciabatta and got four nice sized loaves weighing approximately 1.5 lbs each:

Ciabatta loaves

I was very unsure what would happen to this dough, as it may have acted like an 75% hydration dough, but it had a lot more flour in it than a dough at 75& would have.

I proofed the loaves for 2 hours and baked them and here is what I got:

Baked loaves

The interior was not at all holey:

Crumb

Here are the rest:

the rest of the loaves

Believe it or not the bread was scrumptious! I got raves on it. I served it buttered with broiled Ling Cod and mixed veggies.

Now onto the next batch which I had taken out of the cold room an hour after the other bowl of ruined dough and was working with alongside with. Here is how nice the dough in the second batch looked:

second batch dough

It was soft, bubbly and terrific dough to handle. I divided into three pieces and shaped the loaves which I placed in a couche:

divided dough

dough in couche

I let this dough proof while the first dough was baking. When the other dough was done and it was ready I baked them one by one. Here are all three loaves finished:

finished loaves

I was trying to obtain a bread similar to the Boudin Bakery bread. I was asked if my starters could make bread like theirs. I went to their site and looked up “Boudin” and that is how I found the recipe and technique. I also signed up to be a customer as I thought it would be great to have some sent in the mail to see what it really tasted and looked like. No go for me. At around 30.00 for two loaves, once they figured in shipping, it was too steep a price for me! I will have to visit them someday when I head on down the Coast and pick up a loaf or two! So I still don’t know if I even approached near to their quality, but I aspire to do so, as I am sure many sourdough bakers do. Here is a closeup of the crust on one of my loaves:

crust closeup

Here is a picture of the crumb:

crust

I was surprised at how similar this recipe turned out to be to my own Basic White recipe. It made me feel like I am on the right track. Anyway, the second batch of bread turned out very delicious, with a chewy, crisp, crust and soft, holey crumb. Any bread made with the motherdough smells super, out of this world wonderful.

So this is the tale of two batches of dough, mixed up on the same day, following the same recipe and two VERY different results. This is a good lesson on, “If you follow a recipe and don’t get the same results as the author, don’t always blame the recipe,”(or the author as a matter of fact). Have a great day trying to bake the best sourdough ever!

Two Night Super Sourdough

I whipped up a batch of Two Night Super Sour Bread using Northwest Sourdough starter. I did a preferment the first night . This is how it looked next morning:

preferment

I then built the dough in stages the next day adding more to the dough and letting it ferment until I was finished at the end of the day (You will be folding and strengthening the dough with each addition). I then poured out the dough and gathered it into a ball:

dough ball

I divided it into three:

three balls

I shaped the dough into boules and placed them in colander baskets which were lined with proofing cloths and a rush basket:

proofing

Into the refrigerator they went for their second night. Then next morning I decided to do something a little different. I heated the oven very hot to 500 degrees and put two of the proofed dough balls onto the baking stone. One I covered with my cast iron pot, which was also preheated in the oven:

baking

I baked the two loaves at 500 degrees for five minutes and then turned the oven down to 425 degrees. I also sprayed the uncovered loaf several times during the first five minutes. After 15 minutes, I uncovered the first loaf, taking off the pot.This is how the loaves looked with another fifteen minutes left to bake:

uncovered the pot

Here are the first two loaves done:

done baking

one loaf

one loaf

Here is loaf number three, I baked this loaf under a pot too:

loaf 3

Here are all three loaves:

all three loaves

Here is a pic of the crumb:

crumb

The bread is delicious and tangy, but not as tangy as usual for this recipe. I am wondering if a proofing box during bulk fermentation would help get a more consistant sour in the sourdough. I have had this same recipe turn out very sour, but it is colder in my pantry where I put the preferment and also cooler in my house than during the earlier months. I have noticed when we are doing alot of baking and the kitchen is very warm, that my loaves turn out more sour. I also feel that if it is too warm during the second proofing, you cannot have it proof as long as you would like. So I am wondering if a warmer bulk fermentation, and a cooler second proofing, would give a more consistant sour. Any ideas?

Oat & Honey Soft Sourdough

I have a new recipe called Oat & Honey Soft Sourdough. It is a one day sourdough that is mixed, proofed and baked in one day. I baked it up in bread pans and freeform Artisan style both and it came out great each way.

I used a vigorous starter and bulk fermented for four hours:

bulk fermented dough

After four hours bulk fermentation, I shaped the loaves, putting two into bread pans and two into banneton baskets:

proofing

I then proofed two more hours :

ready to bake

ready to bake

The dough was ready to bake. I baked the bread in a 400 degree oven for 30 minutes turning halfway:

baked

Here is a closeup of the crumb:

crumb

Here are the free form loaves proofed in the banneton baskets:

banneton loaves

banneton loaves

Here are all of the loaves together:

all four loaves

I haven’t sliced a freeform loaf yet to see the crumb, I will post later when I do. The bread came out wonderful, soft, terrific flavor.  The first loaf was sliced and eaten before I could take too many pics of the four loaves together, with my teenagers gobbling as fast as they could. According to them this Oat and Honey Sourdough is “Awesome”.

I will be posting this recipe in the Special Recipes folder for those of you who subscribe to it.

I was able to get some pictures out in the sun! Which is rare here on the Washington coast!

oat bread

crumb

crumb

A Nice Sour Bread

I made up a batch of Sourdough Bread using a new recipe. I also combined a cup of very sour motherdough with the regular Northwest starter, just for flavor because it was alcoholic. The dough bulk fermented well in six hours and looked like this:

bulk fermented dough

I divided the dough into three pieces and shaped them. Each piece was about 2 lbs 2 oz.

three pieces

I put the dough to rest in the banneton baskets and refrigerated the dough overnight:

bannetons

Next morning the dough proofed for two hours and then I slashed the first loaf and popped it into the hot 450 degree oven :

slashed dough

Here is how it came out:

first loaf

Here are the other loaves:

loaf two

loaf 3

Here are all three together:

all three

The bread came out very nice and tangy with a nice crumb:

crumb

crumb

This turned out to be a very nice sourdough and we ate it with ham and cheese for sandwiches. It has been a nice tangy loaf, but not as sour as the Desem bread I was supposed to bake on the same day and didn’t get to until today….gee it knocked my socks off! I did every possible thing wrong with this Desem dough and it still came out pretty good although not as much spring as it should have had. Here it is:

Desem

This dough was supposed to be ready to bake after the other dough was done. I didn’t get it mixed up though, although I had the preferment waiting to go. So I ended up mixing it up later in the day and hoped to get it into the oven…but no…we had to go out…so I just put it into the refrigerator. I took it out this morning and it wasn’t acting too vigorous, so I proofed it for 2 hours and then baked it. Gee it is SOUR!