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Cheating…(Sour Sourdough)

This post will be on cheating… the tasty kind of cheating. I made up some Kalamata, Artichoke Sourdough and I added something to make the bread sour… by cheating. It was certainly a fun and tasty way to bake up some loaves of bread!

Cheating Bread (otherwise known as Kalmata Artichoke Sourdough)

  1. 12 oz -spiced Kalamata Olives/ drain the liquid and reserve both olives and liquid separately(liquid should be around 5.5 oz).
  2. 6.5 oz -Pickled/spiced Artichoke Hearts / drain the liquid and reserve both artichoke hearts and liquid separately(liquid should be around 3.5 oz – combine with the olive liquid).

Combine both the artichoke and olive liquids together to obtain 9 oz /255g of liquid. Set aside the olives and artichoke hearts to drain on a plate and then towel dry/squeeze the olive/artichoke pieces.

Now in a mixing bowl combine:

  1. 16 oz/453g -vigorous sourdough starter @ 100% hydration
  2. 9 oz/ 255g of the reserved liquids from combined hearts and olive liquid which you reserved.
  3. 8 oz/226g water
  4. 30 oz flour 850g- use approximately 20 oz Bread flour and 10 oz All Purpose flour combined.
  5. After autolyse, add .7 oz / 19g sea salt.

Start this mixing of the dough around 3:00 pm in the afternoon. Mix together by hand or mixer all of the ingredients except the salt. After the ingredients are mixed together, cover the dough with plastic or a lid and let the dough set for 30 minutes (autolyse period). After autolyse is done, add the salt, the reserved artichoke hearts which you have chopped into smaller pieces and the olives. Hand knead gently  in the bowl or mix on slow in your dough mixer until salt is well mixed in.

Cover your dough so it doesn’t dry out and let it ferment for about 5 hours. During the ferment time fold the dough around 4-5 times. When bulk ferment is done, cover the dough well and refrigerate overnight. This will make 4 lbs 9.2 oz/2075g of dough at 65.8% hydration.

Next morning take out your dough, uncover it and let it warm up at room temperature for three house, turning the dough once in a while to even the warming process. Then divide the dough into two, three or four loaves depending on what size you want. Shape your dough into the desired shape and place into  well floured bannetons or couche. I use semolina flour. Remember it is better to stagger the shaping of the dough by 30 minutes for each loaf so the loaves are not all ready to go into the oven at the same time. Now allow the dough it’s final proof.

This will take anywhere from one hour to three hours, depending on the activity of the dough and how warm your kitchen is. When it looks like the loaf has one hour of proofing left, turn your oven on to 450F degrees and preheat it with a baking stone inside, for one hour. 10 minutes before you will bake your first loaf, preheat a roasting pan lid in the oven.

When the dough is done proofing, turn out your loaf and slash the top, then slide the dough onto a peel which has been sprinkled with semolina flour. Slide the dough onto the hot stone, spray the loaf all over with water, then place the hot roasting lid over the dough. Close the oven door and bake for 20 minutes.

After 20 minutes, take off the roasting lid to allow the crust to crisp up and brown. Bake for another 10 -15 minutes until the color is a nice deep color.  If you notice that the loaf is browning too fast, turn the oven down to 425 degrees for the last 10 -15 minutes of the bake.

Take out your beautiful loaf and cool on a cooling rack. Reheat the oven and then bake the next loaf.

The cheating loaves have a wonderful tangy flavorful crumb with the help of the vinegar/oil/spices of the liquid added from the olives and artichokes. I had teenagers racing to the kitchen to grab up the slices as soon as I gave the go ahead. You will want to give this bread a try. Have fun baking, I do!

This post will be sent to Susan’s wonderful blog at Yeast Spotting. Go check it out, she always has something nice baking!

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12 Comments

  1. June 15, 2010    

    Thank you for all the great posts! This one is explicit. I look forward to reading more interesting topics.

  2. almostsour almostsour
    May 27, 2010    

    I contemplated starting a forum thread about ‘cheating’. ‘Having tried all the manipulations of starter care, I get little or no tang at all. Then, having tried some of Hensperger’s (sp) recipes that used either raisin water, coffee (black rye), or vinegar, I experimented w/ those ingedients to give some tang. They work moderately well. Straight vinegar works, but the tang is somewhat simple/one-dimensional, rather than the complex flavors of a natural starter. Basalmic vinegar definitely makes it more interesting. Combining the coffee/raisin water approach also brings nice flavors to a desem w/ 22% rye.
    On slashing, I’ve flattened more than a few myself, trying to get some ‘ears’ raised. Sigh. ‘Like going through the first phases of making alot of bricks, I’ll learn this too.
    ‘Great loaf, T. Thx again for sharing.

    • July 27, 2010    

      The wetter doughs don’t make ears, you have to be under 63-64% hydration to make good ears.

  3. tony kirk tony kirk
    May 14, 2010    

    IN MY EARLIER POST I WAS TALKING ABOUT THE 100% HYDRATION SOURDOUGH — THE KALAMATA/ARTICHOKE SEEMS TO BE THE SAME RECIPE WITH THE K/A ADDED — THIS LOOKS GOOD AS WELL AND I AM WONDERING ABOUT THE ARTICHOKES — WOULD THEY BE LIKE MARINATED IN OIL OR PICKLED IN VINEGAR?? — NOT SURE WHAT TO BUY — THANKS FOR YOUR HELP —

    TONY IN TEXAS

    • May 15, 2010    

      The artichokes were pickled in vinegar, the olives were pickled in a vinegar/oil combo, Teresa

  4. Mimi Mimi
    May 14, 2010    

    Great flavor combo. Now all it needs is sundried tomatoes to make it really super mediteranean!!

  5. May 14, 2010    

    Hi Teresa,
    I think I may never get this scoring thing down! Last week I made a batard with a center score, but it was too shallow, and literally disappeared into the loaf – so this week I tried again and scored more deeply, and the result was that the entire loaf flattened out sideways as it baked!

    Keeps one humble!

    • May 16, 2010    

      Hi Dr Fugawe, I did that too, slashed too deeply and the loaf fell sideways, still tasted good though!

  6. May 13, 2010    

    This bread sounds delicious! I’ve never tried putting artichoke hearts in my bread, but it’s a great idea. I’ll definitely give it a try!

  7. tony kirk tony kirk
    May 13, 2010    

    I HAVE MADE THIS BREAD TWICE AND IN MY AND MY FAMILY’S OPINION IT IS THE BEST I HAVE EVER MADE — ONE PROBLEM THOUGH — THE FIRST TRY MY SLASHING WAS GREAT, DEEP ENOUGH TO GET A NICE GRINGE — THE SECOND TRY THE DOUGH KEPT HANGING ON THE BLADE AND I COULD NOT GET IT TO GO VERY DEEP — EXACT SAME RECIPE AND PROCEDURE — DOUGH WAS JUST MORE STICKY — SAME BLADE — ANY SUGGESTIONS?

    THANKS,

    TONY IN TEXAS

    • May 14, 2010    

      Hi Tony, if your dough is sticky, wet the blade with water before slashing, and make a quick slash.

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  1. YeastSpotting May 14, 2010 | Wild Yeast on May 13, 2010 at 11:04 pm

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