Archive for the Desem / Whole Grain Category

Cheesy Topped Loaf

cheese6

This is a companion post to the post Fig-caccia! If you want to make Cheesy Topped Loaf, the formula is at: Fig-caccia!

I made the dough using the formula found on the linked page. I used half of the dough for the Fig-caccia! and half of the dough for the Cheesy Topped Loaf. The dough is 77% hydration and wet, but not too wet as I used a large amount of whole grain flour in the formula.  Continue reading Cheesy Topped Loaf

Fig-caccia!

fig1

I’ve been busy all summer, baking at the new bakery in town. So I haven’t had a lot of time for baking in my own home. Today however, I decided to be creative and do something new. My sweetheart bought me some fresh figs because he knows how much I love figs. Continue reading Fig-caccia!

Baking in the Basement Woodstove!

 

Earlier I mentioned I wanted to try to bake in the woodstove in the basement where I am living. It looks like this: (Wouldn’t it inspire you to try baking in it?)

It has been cold here as of late, so I fired it up and ran it all night long. There were some nice coals in the morning.

Continue reading Baking in the Basement Woodstove!

Chocolate Cinnamon Rye… with Walnuts

Cocoa Cinnamon Rye with Walnuts

Wow, did this bread ever smell great, in dough form, while baking and … while eating! It is at it’s best once cooled and given some time to mellow.

I got the inspiration for the chocolate cinnamon blend from Peter Reinhart’s bread, Chocolate Cinnamon Babka, see my post here:  http://www.northwestsourdough.com/discover/?p=900 from his book, Artisan Breads Every Day. I loved that blend of flavors, chocolate and cinnamon.

Continue reading Chocolate Cinnamon Rye… with Walnuts

Playing with Quinoa

My wonderful mom sent me some Quinoa. I am not sure why, except she knows I like to experiment with grains/flour/seeds etc. So I experimented with the Quinoa, which really isn’t a grain but a seed which can be ground into a flour.  The smell and flavor was very good, so much so, that I made three batches so I could share it around.

Continue reading Playing with Quinoa

Sue’s Whole Wheat Sourdough aka Pink Wig Sourdough

This recipe was inspired by Sue, who tries to maintain a low sugar, whole grain diet as she battles cancer with courage and humor.  She wrote of this recipe, “According to my Anti-Cancer book, sourdough bread is in a class by itself and is allowed on the diet even if not whole wheat, so this must be doubly good for me.”

However, Ray Glaze was the moving force behind this bread and we worked together to produce it. He also named it Pink Wig in honor of Sue. May this bread also honor all survivors and victims of cancer.

Continue reading Sue’s Whole Wheat Sourdough aka Pink Wig Sourdough

Light Wheat Desem

I’ve  been working with the Desem in new recipes and having absolutely fabulous results. Here is a Desem bread I call Light Wheat Desem and another that I am in the process of working with called Desem Milk ‘N Honey. Here are pictures of the Light Wheat Desem:

This is the overnight preferment:

preferment

Light Wheat Desem

three loaves

Light Desem Crumb

crumb

This turned out to be a really great bread. The preferment had a malted cracked Rye berry in it. The taste was incredible. I am also working on a Medium Desem with a bit more of the whole grain flour in it. I will get back on that one. I might be putting the two recipes in the Special Recipe folder when I get them worked out.

How I do Desem…

I had several emails asking me how I do my Desem bread, technique, recipe etc. So here goes…

I have been keeping an 80% hydration Desem in a bowl in the refrigerator. It has been easier to feed, and easier to use.

80% hydration dough

80% hydration just means approximately twice the amount of flour to water ratio. Like a cup of flour and 1/2 cup of water etc. Or for every five ounces of flour/ four ounces of water. Anyway, I take out one and one half cups of active 80% Desem which was fed the day before and make a preferment the night before I am going to bake. Preferment:

  • 1 – 1/2 cup 80% hydration active Desem starter - 13.5 oz
  • 1 – 1/2 cups water room temperature – 12 oz
  • 3 cups organic Whole Wheat flour aged at least one week 13.5 oz

Desem preferment after mixing:

preferment after mixing

Desem preferment the next morning:

preferment next morning

Mix together the preferment ingredients, cover and let ferment overnight at room temperature. Next morning add the preferment mixture to your dough mixer and add:

  • 2 cups water room temperature – 16 oz
  • Turn the mixer on low and add 6 cups whole wheat flour – 27 oz
  • After the dough is mixed turn off your mixer and let the dough autolyse for ten – 15 minutes.

Desem right after mixing:

desem after mixing

After autolyse, add:

  • 4 teaspoons Kosher salt – .8 oz

turn the mixer on low and let it knead the dough for about 7 minutes. If you notice the dough tearing as it kneads, turn off the mixer no matter how long it has been mixing.

Desem dough after autolyse and 7 minutes of mixing:

Desem dough after kneading

Let the dough proof 4 – 5 hours or when about doubled. Then stir down dough, pour it out and shape loaves.

dough

desem loaves shaped

I made two loaves a little over 2.5 lbs each. I then let the dough proof about 2 – 2.5 hours. When ready bake in a preheated oven at 425 degrees for about 30 minutes, slashing and steaming and turning loaf halfway, as usual.( I have been slashing, spraying my loaves once, and then covering the dough with a roasting lid for the first ten minutes, as it is easiest and seems to give great results).

First Desem loaf:

first loaf

Second Desem loaf:

second loaf

Both loaves

Here is the crumb from the first loaf:

crumb

So there you have it, recipe, technique and all !  Once you taste a loaf of Desem, you will go back to baking it over and over, it is that good, and addicting!

Desem…Again!!

I really love the flavor of Desem sourdough bread. It is actually addicting! It is always sour, and when toasted, it tastes like malted wheat. I made up another batch of Desem, but this time I was more careful to use wheat berries that I had ground and let season (age) for two weeks. I had read that the mills did that because freshly ground wheat does not bake up as well as aged flour. Well, it seems to be true. I got a great development of gluten and the dough handled better. I am really getting a nice open crumb for a 100% Whole Wheat flour bread. Of course, as you know, the only other ingredients are water, salt (I have been using Kosher salt) and the wild Desem yeast. That makes for a nice loaf of bread devoid of chemicals or other ingredients that may have been processed. I have pure artesian water that has no chemicals in it, so I am really lucky there. Here is the preferment that is ready to use for making a Desem dough:

preferment

I mixed the dough for nine minutes as that is when it looked done:

dough

After bulk fermenting for four hours I shaped and benched (rested) the dough:

shaping

Then came final shaping and proofing:

proofing

This time I did not proof in a very warm, humid environment but just allowed the dough to proof at room temperature. It took around 2.5 hours. I then baked at 425 for 30 minutes. Here is the first loaf:

first loaf

Here is the second loaf:

second loaf

Here is the crumb, as you can see it is nice, open and nicely textured:

crumb

There is a lot more leeway for using and baking with Desem. If you have a Desem starter, I would encourage you to experiment.

Desem/Motherdough ~ Gee What Won't I Do?

Yep, just messin around. I like the flavor of Desem so much, and Motherdough is beyond great, that I thought I would combine them. I started out the night before baking, with a preferment, using Desem combined with water/flour/etc. I set it out overnight at room temperature and next morning it looked like this:

Desem preferment

Then I added some Motherdough which, if you didn’t know, is just using a vigorous starter kept at 80% hydration (for me anyway) and refrigerated(it developes the flavor). The motherdough looked like this:

Motherdough starter

I added more water, flour, salt, some oil and came up with a nice dough which only took three hours to ferment, although I let it go four. It then looked like this after bulk fermentation:

dough after bulk fermentation

It was a little on the sticky side, but I shaped up the loaves and weighed them out at just over 2 lbs each and then put them to proof in bannetons:

proofing in bannetons

The proofing rate slowed a bit and they took 2.5 hours to proof and really needed 3, but I was running out of time before I needed to make dinner. So…. here is the first loaf:

(Sorry about the poor quality of pics, no sun outside, and poor lighting inside. I still need a lightbox or something).

first loaf

The second loaf I baked a little hotter as the first one came out a bit light:

second loaf

The third loaf:

Third loaf

Here are some pics of the crumb:

crumb

crumb pics

The bread flavor is really great! It is a very nice tangy sour. The crust was wonderful, crusty and crispy. This was altogether a great marriage between two great flavored starters. I got the idea of using Desem starter as a flavoring because the Whole Wheat tastes so terrific after fermenting with Desem, I thought it would interesting to use it as the flavoring besides adding another vigorous starter as a complement. I really am having so much fun baking with sourdough. I love experimenting and doing off the wall things with it. I also baked another Soft Sourdough a couple of days ago using Desem again as a flavoring. It came out wonderful and makes terrific sandwiches and toast. I haven’t had a lot of time for posting though. If you notice carefully behind the pictures of the bread, the walls are barren and the wallpaper is ripped off. I am redoing the room by repainting the ceiling and wallpapering. Then comes the carpet. So you see, even though I am still baking, I am extra busy! If I get a chance, I will post about the soft sourdough, if I don’t …. I will continue on…. till next baking day,

Teresa