Sourdough, sourdough, sourdough, oh yea, sourdough!

Sue’s Whole Wheat Sourdough aka Pink Wig Sourdough

This recipe was inspired by Sue, who tries to maintain a low sugar, whole grain diet as she battles cancer with courage and humor.  She wrote of this recipe, “According to my Anti-Cancer book, sourdough bread is in a class by itself and is allowed on the diet even if not whole wheat, so this must be doubly good for me.”

However, Ray Glaze was the moving force behind this bread and we worked together to produce it. He also named it Pink Wig in honor of Sue. May this bread also honor all survivors and victims of cancer.

This 100% Whole Wheat Sourdough Bread is made  using a 100% hydration starter. Bakers often keep their wholegrain starters at 100% hydration, so you won’t have to do any conversions on this recipe.

Sue’s Pink Wig Sourdough:

Start by feeding your sourdough starter the night before making the preferment, then the morning of the preferment mixing day, feed your starter again in the morning. Then late in the evening before retiring, mix up your preferment using:

Preferment:
  • Whole Wheat Starter @ 100% 9oz/255g (feed starter in the morning)
  • Water 12oz/340g
  • Whole Wheat flour 12 oz/340g (make sure this is not freshly ground flour)
  • salt .2oz/5.7g
Mix in evening then leave the preferment out overnight covered (around 9 oclock)
This preferment is at 100% hydration.
Next morning mix together:
  • All of the preferment- 2lbs 1.2 oz/941g @ 100%
  • Water- 10 oz/283g
  • Whole Wheat flour- 22 oz/623g (not freshly ground)
  • Salt- .5/14g  -no need to autolyse
This will make about 4lbs 1.7 oz/1862g @ 68.9%
Let dough set 10 minutes, then hand knead for 7- 10 minutes (knead in bowl with no added flour)
Cover your mixing bowl and allow the dough to ferment for about three hours – stretch and fold the dough at least three or four times during fermentation time.
Now shape your loaves, place the shaped loaves into bannetons and then proof- proofing takes about 1.5 hours.  Slash loaf and then bake. I baked at 450 degrees (in a preheated oven with an oven stone) for the first 20 minutes, turned the heat down to 425 and bake another 15 minutes or so, use a steam lid for the first 20 minutes.
If you want to fool some picky eaters use white Whole Wheat flour, it looks lighter once baked up and it actually is 100% Whole Wheat.
This bake resulted in some really terrific moist Whole Wheat sourdough loaves that tasted great right away still warm with melting butter, it also makes wonderful toast in the morning with your cup of java.
Thank you Sue for giving such courageous inspiration, get well fast!
For a revised version, enough to make two loaves at 750 grams each follow this formula but use the directions above:
Preferment:
210 grams 100% starter
275 grams water
275 grams whole wheat flour
4 grams salt
Follow directions above.

Final dough:
follow formula on web site and then add:
all of the preferment
240 grams of water
520 grams whole wheat flour
12 grams salt

Continue with directions above.

Makes 1536 grams ( some is for sticking to the hands and bowl)
Divide into two loaves at around 750 grams each at 68.9% hydration

Will fill two 8″ diameter bannetons nicely.

10 Comments

  1. Sam Wong Sam Wong
    June 12, 2010    

    Hi,

    I want to try this, but I don’t have any whole wheat starter. Can I use my AP flour sourdough starter for this recipe?

    Thx, Sam

  2. June 12, 2010    

    Yes, Sam, it will work great!

  3. June 12, 2010    

    my daughter doesn’t like whole wheat bread, so i guess this would be very great for her since she wouldn’t know that. i think it’s the grainy grains that makes her dislike whole grain breads. thanks for sharing!

    • Ice Ice
      June 13, 2010    

      You can buy finely ground whole wheat. That takes care or the “grainy grains”

  4. June 13, 2010    

    what a nice way to trick your kids to eat whole wheat bread. :)

  5. Mimi Mimi
    June 18, 2010    

    It’s amazing how good for you sourdough is. I was reading that it is really good for diabetics too.

  6. July 19, 2010    

    I just made this yesterday. It’s really wonderful – thank you!

  7. July 19, 2010    

    Glad you liked it Georgia, wait until you have had it toasted…yummy!

  8. July 20, 2010    

    I used this recipe but instead of 100% whole wheat, I used 1/3 ww, 1/3 ap, and 1/3 bread flour. It came out yummy!

  9. Connie Connie
    May 27, 2013    

    This is my first attempt at something more exotic than the beginner bread from your first book. I am so impressed with the depth of flavor in this bread! I made a starter from some locally sourced flour about 2 years ago but have not been very adventurous as of yet. I didn’t try to convert to a whole wheat starter – I just used my white starter and this bread turned out amazingly well! Your online books are a wealth of information. I hope you find a way to publish and sell them. Many thanks!

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  1. YeastSpotting June 18, 2010 | Wild Yeast on June 17, 2010 at 11:02 pm
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