Motherdough 70

No, not 70 years old! 70% hydration! I baked up some motherdough bread today. Bread made with motherdough is out of this world delicious. The flavor of the wheat is brought out to it’s fullest. The smell is heavenly. The crumb is soft and somewhat custardy moist and tender. This is really good bread.

 

For this motherdough preferment make up some dough at 70% hydration and refrigerate it for 3 to 4 days. This particular motherdough has a small amount of salt in it to help maintain the gluten’s integrity.

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The Motherdough @ 70%

This will make 2 lbs of motherdough, you will only be using 1 lb, the rest can be used for pizza dough or another recipe.

  • 3.1 oz/ 87g -vigorous sourdough starter at 100% hydration
  • 12 oz/340g – water
  • .1 oz/2.8g salt
  • 17.8oz/504g bread flour (I substituted 2 oz of whole wheat flour for part of the flour)
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Mix all of the above ingredients into a  dough by hand and then refrigerate for 3 – 4 days (mark the container with the date) in a covered container. Take the dough out a couple of time and fold it during it’s refrigeration time. I did this twice (every other day).
You will have 2 lbs 1 oz/935g at 70% hydration.
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Final bread dough for Motherdough 70 Bread: (start early in the morning)
  • 1 lb/453g  - ripened motherdough at 70% hydration
  • 20 oz/567g  - water ( I used warm water at 100F degrees)
  • .5 oz/14g  - oil
  • .2 oz/5g  - diastatic malt powder
  • .7/19g  - salt
  • 32 oz/907g – bread flour
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Start by tearing the motherdough into chunks and placing into your mixing bowl or dough trough. Then add the warm water, the oil, malt and salt. Stir all ingredients together. Then add the flour and mix until the dough comes together. No need to autolyse when you are using motherdough. This will make approximately 4 lb 5 oz/1967g at 64% hydration.

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Allow the dough to ferment for three hours, folding the dough once each hour. Then refrigerate the dough for up to six hours. In the late afternoon take out the dough and let it set for two hours at room temperature. Then divide (I made three loaves weighing around 1 lb 6 oz) and shape the dough and place the dough into the bannetons or baskets, covered with a plastic bag. Next, place it back into the refrigerator overnight. In the morning, stagger taking out the loaves about every half hour or so.

I placed the loaves still in their baskets  into a warming oven to warm up and proof. A microwave is a good place to warm up your dough, so is your dishwasher.  To warm up your microwave, heat a cup of water in the microwave and then place your dough into the microwave, allowing the cup of hot water to keep the microwave warm and moist. You can also use the heating cycle on your dishwasher.

Once your loaves are ready (mine took three hours to proof), slash and bake at 450F degrees in a preheated oven with a baking stone.  For the first 20 minutes of the bake, I cover the dough with a roasting lid after I  have sprayed the dough liberally with water.  Once the 20 minutes are up, take off the lid and allow the bread to brown. This takes another 10 – 15 minutes.  Remove the loaf once it’s done and place the roasting pan back in to preheat for the next loaf. Cool, eat, enjoy!!!

 

 

My boss got a loaf … good to butter up the boss….  :)

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6 Responses to 'Motherdough 70'

  1. Sarah says:

    This worked out great! I have only been playing with sourdough for about a month and a half, and this was one of the first times I really felt good about the results! I tried to post a picture, but I’m not sure if it worked.
    Looks wonderful and tastes great.

  2. Connie says:

    What a gorgeous bread you made. It’s on my list of breads to bake for sure. I hope mine will be as beautiful as yours did.

Trackbacks/Pingbacks
  1. [...] 70. I had started that batch of preferment on August 3rd (written on the container). I made up the Motherdough 70 and posted about it later in the week. Then got too busy to use the rest of the motherdough (16 [...]

  2. [...] 70. I had started that batch of preferment on August 3rd (written on the container). I made up the Motherdough 70 and posted about it later in the week. Then got too busy to use the rest of the motherdough (16 [...]

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