Sunny Sourdough

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It was a wonderfully sunny day on this island so I named this bread Sunny Sourdough. Sunny sourdough is made with motherdough that has been aged at least 3 – 5 days. I had some 60% motherdough that was two weeks old and I wanted to use it so I made this bread.

You need to start ahead by making some 60% motherdough. Sunny Sourdough formula takes 245g (about 8 oz), but it is always good to have extra motherdough on hand. Click here to make the 60% motherdough.

After your motherdough has fermented in the refrigerator for at least three days you can make Sunny Sourdough:

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Sunny Sourdough  

Makes 1366 g at 67% hydration  (two loaves)

  •  245 g motherdough 60% hydration -aged (pull apart into chunks)
  • 450 g water
  • 15 g salt
  • 30 g whole wheat flour
  • 1/2 teaspoon diastatic malt (optional)
  • 626 g bread flour

Mix together the motherdough, water, salt, whole wheat flour and diastatic malt.

Incorporate the bread flour.

Allow the dough to proof at 75F for 5 hours folding three times (or at room temperature for 6 hours).

Shape loaves.

Refrigerate your loaves overnight, covered in plastic.

Next day, stagger loaves, proof at 78F until done proofing (it took 5.5 hours for mine and they needed longer). I used my Brod and Taylor proofer (if you can afford one, just get one!).

Bake in a preheated oven at 480F for 15 minutes with steam then 10 – 15 more minutes without steam.

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Long fermented motherdough will produce a loaf with a smell and taste so good you won’t believe you made it. It also has a great oven spring, even when the dough looks somewhat slack.

That is because the C02 is being absorbed into the dough during the long cold ferment and when it is hit by hight heat, the gas bubbles quickly expand creating large holes. You have to make sure your oven is VERY hot. I preheat my oven for at least an hour at 500+ degrees and turn it down to 480 once the loaf is in the oven.

The slackness of the dough makes it hard to estimate when the proofing is done. Just imagine that it will take a very long time and you will probably be right (5 – 8 hours is not uncommon).

 

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4 Responses to 'Sunny Sourdough'

  1. Ken (nadoj) says:

    Beautiful addition to your blog. Thanks for your post!

  2. tonyk says:

    I MAY HAVE ASKED THIS QUESTION BEFORE BUT I DO NOT REMEMBER THE ANSWER — I HAVE SOME MOTHERDOUGH THAT I MADE OVER TWO WEEKS AGO — IT LOOKS LIKE A VERY DRYED OUT PIECE OF DOUGH — IF I USE ENOUGH TO MAKE THE TWO LOAVES OF YOUR SUNNY SOURDOUGH HOW DO I REFRESH THE REMAINING MOTHER DOUGH SUCH THAT I WILL HAVE MORE OF IT AS NEEDED??? — AS ALWAYS THANKS TO YOU FOR ALL OF YOUR WORK IN THIS AREA AND FOR YOUR SUPPORT OF ALL US LEARNERS IN THE SOURDOUGH WORLD — I’M GETTING BETTER BUT HAVE A WAY TO GO — I THINK I NOW KNOW HOW TO SEND PHOTOS AND WILL TRY TO SEND MORE OF THEM OF MY EFFORTS — I JUST GOT A NEW ANKARSRUM MIXER AS MY BOSCH DIED LAST WEEKS — ANY COMMENTS ON THIS MIXER? –

    TONYK

  3. elizabeth says:

    Looking forward to trying Sunny Sourdough, I have the motherdough aging in the fridge.

    Could I get the same results, if I shaped and proofed the loaves in the morning, after the dough spent the night in the fridge?

  4. Charles Mc. says:

    I have been trying to get a more “sour” taste to my bread and from what I have been reading it seems building up the dough in stages like using the Mother dough and a long cool refrigeration is the answer. As for rising the dough I have good sucess with a styrofoam ice chest turned upside down and a hole drilled in bottom with a ceramic lite fixture attached inside (cord runs out hole) and a little nite light. Or as Alton Brown suggests having kitchen tools that are multi tasker’s I use a Seed mat in a inexpensive greenhouse I bought from Harbor freight that has a vinyl zip up cover. Both for baking and my garden!

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