Learn to bake sourdough bread - the best bread in the world!

Mill Grain @100%

I love Mill Grain Bread. You can add any kind of grains or seeds you like. It smells and tastes so good! I know that many people if not most, keep their starters at 100% hydration. You might have noticed that the last several blog entries with recipes were also using the starter at 100% hydration.I have been keeping my starters at 100% hydration and creating new formulas or recipes using 100% hydration. So here you go:

Mill Grain Loaf using 100% Hydration: (I started this around 2:30 pm and had the dough shaped and into the refrigerator around 9:00 pm. You can get your grains ready even earlier to allow time for the mixture to cool.

First get your grains prepared:

Add together in a medium saucepan:

 

  • 9.5 oz/219g of assorted cracked grains and seeds

I used:
1.5 oz/42g flax seeds – coarsely ground
1.5 oz/42g  Sunflower seeds- raw but lightly toasted, no salt
2 oz/56g Millet seeds
3 oz/85g cracked grains (wheat, rye, etc)
1.5 oz/42g Sesame seeds

I then added :

  • 8 oz water
  • .2 oz/5g of salt

I then brought the grains/seeds and water/salt to a boil while stirring. Stir and take the pan off the heat. Allow the mixture to cool. The water should be almost completely absorbed. The flax seeds will make the mixture somewhat slimy/slippery.

Now get your dough going. In a large mixing bowl or mixer add together:

  • 16 oz/453g vigorous starter @ 100% hydration
  • 13 oz/368g water
  • 26 oz total amount of flour ( Reserve 5 oz/141g  of flour to be added after autolyse) You can use part of the 26 oz of flour as part whole wheat if you like, I used 3 oz of Whole Wheat flour as part of this amount.

Mix the ingredients together well (remember to reserve 5 oz of the flour to add later) and then let the dough autolyse (rest) for 20 minutes. Now add to the autolysed dough:

  • .6 oz/17g of salt
  • The reserved 5 oz/141g of flour.
  • Cooled grain/seed mixture (It can be lukewarm)

Without the grain mixture the dough is 61 % hydration and weighs 3 lbs 7.8 oz or 1581g

With the grain mixture added to the dough the hydration is 66% hydration and weighs: 4 lbs 9.3 oz or 2078 g

Let the dough mixture ferment in a covered container for four hours, turning the dough once each hour. Then refrigerate the dough for two hours (This is especially for warmer weather when the dough is very warm and you need to chill it down somewhat so that it doesn’t overproof in the refrigerator overnight). Take the dough out of the refrigerator and shape into loaves. Place the shaped loaves back into the refrigerator overnight, make sure to cover the loaves with a plastic bag.

Next morning take out your loaves one at a time, staggered 35 minutes apart and allow them to warm up and final proof. It took my loaves 3 hours with a microwave proofing box.

To use your microwave as a proofing box: I warm proofed the loaves by placing a thick microwave proof mug in the microwave filled with water and bringing it to a boil (about two minutes). I then left the mug in the corner of the microwave and placed my proofing dough into the microwave and shut the door.

Don’t turn the microwave on, just allow the hot mug of water to heat and humidify the interior of your microwave and use it as a proofing box for your dough. I placed the timer on for 30 minutes and every 30 minutes, I rotated the loaves (I had two loaves) into the microwave to warm up, I heated the cup of water each time I rotated the loaves. Be careful handling the cup of hot water and use a hot mitt when you do handle it.

When the dough was proofed, I baked the loaves in a 450 degree oven with the roasting lid method of steaming. The oven was preheated for one hour with a baking stone and a roasting lid (the lid is put in the oven about 5 minutes before you use it). The dough is slashed, put onto the hot stone, sprayed all over once and then the roasting lid is placed over the dough.

Bake for 20 minutes and then remove the roasting lid and place it on top of your oven until the next loaf is baked. Now bake the loaf for about 15 more minutes at 425-430 degrees or until the loaf is nicely browned and sounds hollow when you tap on the bottom of it. Or a bread thermometer reads 205-210 degrees F. when inserted into the center of the loaf.  I like to turn the loaf at least twice during the bake. Once after the first 20 minutes and then again during the last 15 minutes for even browning.

I baked up two large loaves with this formula. Just make sure you have enough to share… you will need it. Happy Baking everyone!

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33 Comments

  1. elizabeth elizabeth
    February 23, 2012    

    Thank you Teresa, can’t wait to try the bread! I made a stout flax loaf the other day that my husband loved, but it didn’t use sourdough starter. I’m happy this has so many seeds/grains AND sourdough, I love sourdough!

  2. elizabeth elizabeth
    February 23, 2012    

    Is there any mixing, other than combining ingredients, after adding the grain mixture and remaining salt and flour? I’m going to assume it is only the four folds? I have my dough mixed up right now and wasn’t sure when I got to this part in the instructions.

    • February 23, 2012    

      Hi Elizabeth, there is only the initial mixing and the four folds. I made up a batch of this bread yesterday, it really is my favorite bread. So delicious!

      Teresa

  3. elizabeth elizabeth
    February 14, 2012    

    I showed your lame to my husband and he said he’d make me one. I’m so glad, I don’t like the curved lame I have.

  4. Elizabeth Elizabeth
    February 5, 2012    

    Thanks and Thank you for your video tutorials. I noticed in one of the vidoes, you mentioned your slasher was bought on an Australian website, do you have a link? Or maybe you will be selling them? I think you said your son made them at one point? Would love to purchase one.

    • February 7, 2012    

      As far as I know, the Australian source has not provided them for years. My son did make them and I sold them for him in my store, but he is on hiatus right now. I am not sure if or when I will have them available again. I will be sure to post if I have them again. Thank you!

  5. February 5, 2012    

    The roasting pan method works great! You won’t go back after trying it. I like to use a Oregon flour from Pendleton Mills called Morbread flour. It is awesome flour. It is probably mostly a local flour or west coast flour. As far as cracked grains, you can pretty much use any cracked grains including bulgar. I have used many different types and they have all worked out fine. The absorption rate of water might differ a little, but not enough to make your dough unusable.

  6. Elizabeth Elizabeth
    February 5, 2012    

    For the 3oz cracked grains, is it wheat or rye cereal labeled “cracked”, not something like bulgur?

  7. Elizabeth Elizabeth
    February 5, 2012    

    Thank you. I will use bread flour, I usually use Gold Medal Better For Bread flour. Is there a bread flour you like best?

    I’m going to try your roasting lid method of baking, looks easy and simple. I’ve been baking my sourdough rounds in covered cast iron pots, but cannot get a nice crispy browned crust without burning the bottom. I have to turn the heat down to 375 and cook 25mn covered and 22 uncovered. The taste is good, but the baking method is not working out. Hope I have luck with your method!

  8. Elizabeth Elizabeth
    February 5, 2012    

    For the 26oz flour, you used 3oz ww and the rest white, is it bread flour or all-purpose white?

    • February 5, 2012    

      Hi Elizabeth, use bread flour if you have it, it is stronger to carry the weight of the seeds/grains.

  9. Linda Rose Linda Rose
    November 1, 2010    

    I am a friend of Teresa’s and got to downlaod and print her entire book. It is here in the Library in Tokeland if anyone would like to look at it. It is a great book. Congratulations Teresa. I love it, Thank you!!

  10. Patty Patty
    September 15, 2010    

    One more comment, then I’m done: I made this again–sold one & kept one– & just praised the Lord while I was slicing it to make ham sandwiches for my husband & son to take to work–such a beautiful moist crumb & rich aroma–I love this bread! 🙂 Thanks Teresa.

    • September 16, 2010    

      Hi Patty, I have to admit, it is one of my favorites as well. I am glad it works out well for you. Teresa

  11. September 9, 2010    

    Hi Tony, the proofing time will be whatever it is. Every loaf and every batch is different for a home baker. Put one loaf in 30 minutes before the other loaf and just keep checking them. It would be great if I could get two loaves in together. Good luck on your bake, Teresa

  12. TONYK TONYK
    September 9, 2010    

    RE: PROOFING IN MICROWAVE —

    IF I CAN GET TWO LOAVES IN THE MICROWAVE AT THE SAME TIME WOULD THE PROOFING TIME BE JUST 90 MINUTES IF I REHEAT THE WATER EVERY 30 MINUTES ? — OR SHOULD I STILL FOLLOW YOU METHOD OF ALTERNATING LOAVES?

    SO MANY QUESTIONS AND SO MANY THANKS FOR YOUR ADVICE —

    TONYK

  13. September 9, 2010    

    WHAT ARE THE INDICATORS THAT THE BREAD IF PROOFED — PRESSING A FINTER INTO THE DOUGH AND SEEING IF THE INDENTATION SLOWLY RECOVERS OR HOW MUCH THE DOUGH HAS RISEN — THIS IS A BIG PROBLEM FOR ME — TONYK

  14. Patty Patty
    September 8, 2010    

    Baked it–ate some–sold some–everyone loves it! This is a keeper. 🙂

  15. September 8, 2010    

    Hi Tony, I don’t know what i would do without you finding my typos! Thanks! I fixed it. Happy baking!
    Teresa

    • TONYK TONYK
      September 8, 2010    

      GLAD I COULD HELP, TERESA, I AM AN OLD MATHEMATICAL ENGINEER AND I USUALLY CHECK NUMBERS THAT DON’T SEEM RIGHT — I LOVE YOUR RECIPES AND PHOTOS AND HAVE TRIED MANY OF THEM — JUST KEEP THEM COMING — I HAVE A BAKING STONE THAT IS ABOUT 1″ THICK SO DO YOU THINK CHANGING THE TEMP. FROM 450*F TO 425*F FOR THE LAST 15 MINUTES WILL MAKE MUCH OF A DIFFERENCE? — SINCE THE STONE WILL HOLD THE TEMP STEADY FOR A LONG TIME?

      THANKS SO MUCH FOR YOUR RESPONSES —

      TONYK

      TONYK

      • September 9, 2010    

        Actually Tony, the lid on the dough keeps it from being exposed to the very hot oven, it is somewhat protected. Once you take off the lid, the initial temperature can be too hot and the top of the crust can burn. So I usually turn the oven down some to keep it from coming back on and trying to heat up again. Experiment and see if leaving the temperature the same will work for you. Different ovens behave differently, also breads that are not lean or are higher in sugar have a different temperature requirement.

  16. TONYK TONYK
    September 8, 2010    

    AFTER REMOVING THE ROASTER LID YOU SAY TO BAKE AT 225 TO 240 IS THIS *F OR *C AS THIS SEEMS SO MUCH LOWER THAN THE 450*F INITIAL TEMP — THANKS FOR YOUR HELP — I AM LOOKING FORWARD TO MAKING THIS BREAD —

    TONYK

  17. September 8, 2010    

    Hi, I am looking for a simple recipe for sourdough bread made with home-milled rye flour and home-milled wheat flour. I have the grain mills available for the http://www.providentliving.org.nz website and need some people with expertise or experience in sourdough bread-making to help me find a standard basic recipe for the grain mill users.

    The reason I’m looking for a sourdough solution is that bread-making yeast is expensive and consumed. People on low budgets with these grain mills want ways to use the whole-grain flour they mill. Cay you help?

  18. August 31, 2010    

    Hi Pete, it does sound like it would work, but anytime I tried to push that envelope, I was disappointed. Teresa

  19. Pete Pete
    August 31, 2010    

    Sorry! The 3rd sentence “How about a starter…because it becomes “vigorous” should be:
    How about a starter…UNTIL it becomes “vigorous”? Thanks, Pete

  20. Pete Pete
    August 31, 2010    

    Hi Teresa: thanks for the very interesting recipe and procedure. You mention using a “vigorous” starter. How about a starter directly out of the ‘frig–but a longer proof to compensate for its inactivity because it becomes “vigorous’? What’s your take on that? Thanks, Pete

  21. Patty Patty
    August 30, 2010    

    Hi Teresa,
    This bread looks amazing–what’s new? 🙂 I’m interested in the microwave proofing you’ve introduced in this post. At this point I just pull my first loaf from the fridge to proof on the counter for about a half an hour during the last half of pre-heating my oven–and proof each successive loaf while the current loaf is baking. What does this new method gain me? I’m guessing the moisture from the evaporating water does good things, but wonder how much & if it’s worth the effort. Have you compared two loaves–one counter proofed & one microwave oven proofed to see the diff? Or do you use this technique just for this bread for a particular reason? Thanks again for another beautiful bread to try out! Patty

    • August 31, 2010    

      Hi Patty, I like having warmer dough going into the oven. It really helps the crumb open up and you get a better oven spring especially with the lower hydration dough.

      In a banneton the dough has a hard time warming up evenly and the dough against the banneton can be still cold and unproofed while the dough on top is proofed and ready to go, causing uneven oven spring. Warming up the whole banneton helps overcome this problem somewhat.

  22. August 30, 2010    

    Looks wonderful! I’m new at sourdough baking and the weight measurements on this recipe scare me – but I love multi-grain breads! I may have to attempt this!
    Gina

    • August 30, 2010    

      Gina, get a kitchen scale and you will find your baking gets a lot easier, not more difficult.

  23. TONYK TONYK
    August 30, 2010    

    I BELIEVE YOU HAVE THE TEMPERATURE WHEN BAKED WRONG — (105 TO 110?) —

    TONYK

    • August 30, 2010    

      Yep you are right Tony thanks for noticing, I will edit that, Teresa

  24. Jes Jes
    August 30, 2010    

    LOVE IT!

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