Playing with Quinoa

My wonderful mom sent me some Quinoa. I am not sure why, except she knows I like to experiment with grains/flour/seeds etc. So I experimented with the Quinoa, which really isn’t a grain but a seed which can be ground into a flour.  The smell and flavor was very good, so much so, that I made three batches so I could share it around.

Instead of just grinding the Quinoa into flour, I soaked it for several hours and then put it in my blender and blenderized it to a smooth  consistency. Like this:

 

Quinoa Sourdough Bread:

The day before baking add together:

  • 4 oz/113g whole meal Quinoa
  • 6 oz/170 warm water
Allow the Quinoa to soak up the water for about three hours or so. Then in the evening before going to bed:
Place your Quinoa/water  mixture and 6 oz/170g  more water into your blender and blend at high speed for about 1/2 minute.
Put this mixture into a mixing bowl or dough folding trough and then add:
  • 3 oz/85g vigorous starter which you fed that same morning (I used my whole wheat Desem starter)
  • 6 oz/170g of whole wheat flour
  • .1 oz/2.8g of salt
Mix all ingredients together and allow the mixture to set, covered at room temperature overnight.
Next morning add together:
  • All of the Quinoa preferment
  • 7  oz/ 198g water
  • .5  oz/14g salt
  • 6 oz/ 170gg whole wheat flour
  • 14 oz/396g bread flour
Makes 3 lb 5 oz/1505g of dough at 65% hydration.
Mix well and then ferment at room temperature for 4 hours, fold the dough once each hour. The dough will start out with almost no gluten structure:
And after several folds it will end up with a much stronger gluten structure:
.
.
However, Quinoa does not have gluten and the whole wheat flour weakens the gluten bonding, so the bread has a tendency to have cracks in the crust. Handle the dough gently. After 4 hours of fermenting, preshape your dough and let it bench rest for 15 minutes.
.
.
Then final shape your dough and place in bannetons or couche. I divide the dough into two pieces weighing approximately 1 lb 9 oz/708g each. Final proof the dough which takes about 1.5 – 2 hours and then bake in a preheated hot oven at 450F degrees on top of a baking stone.
.
Make sure to preheat your oven and stone really well. Put your roasting pan lid into the oven to preheat at least 5 minutes before baking.  Turn your proofed dough out onto a peel, slash and then place the dough on top of the hot baking stone. Spray the dough once all over and cover with a hot roasting lid. Bake for 20 minutes and then remove the lid. Bake for 15 more minutes. Cool and enjoy. The smell and flavor of this bread is very satisfying.
.

    northwestsourdough

    Teresa L Greenway - Sourdough bread baker, author, teacher, entrepreneur. Join my baking classes at: https://tinyurl.com/nbe3ejd

    Click Here to Leave a Comment Below

    Leave a Comment: