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Playing with Quinoa

My wonderful mom sent me some Quinoa. I am not sure why, except she knows I like to experiment with grains/flour/seeds etc. So I experimented with the Quinoa, which really isn’t a grain but a seed which can be ground into a flour.  The smell and flavor was very good, so much so, that I made three batches so I could share it around.

Instead of just grinding the Quinoa into flour, I soaked it for several hours and then put it in my blender and blenderized it to a smooth  consistency. Like this:

 

Quinoa Sourdough Bread:

The day before baking add together:

  • 4 oz/113g whole meal Quinoa
  • 6 oz/170 warm water
Allow the Quinoa to soak up the water for about three hours or so. Then in the evening before going to bed:
Place your Quinoa/water  mixture and 6 oz/170g  more water into your blender and blend at high speed for about 1/2 minute.
Put this mixture into a mixing bowl or dough folding trough and then add:
  • 3 oz/85g vigorous starter which you fed that same morning (I used my whole wheat Desem starter)
  • 6 oz/170g of whole wheat flour
  • .1 oz/2.8g of salt
Mix all ingredients together and allow the mixture to set, covered at room temperature overnight.
Next morning add together:
  • All of the Quinoa preferment
  • 7  oz/ 198g water
  • .5  oz/14g salt
  • 6 oz/ 170gg whole wheat flour
  • 14 oz/396g bread flour
Makes 3 lb 5 oz/1505g of dough at 65% hydration.
Mix well and then ferment at room temperature for 4 hours, fold the dough once each hour. The dough will start out with almost no gluten structure:
And after several folds it will end up with a much stronger gluten structure:
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However, Quinoa does not have gluten and the whole wheat flour weakens the gluten bonding, so the bread has a tendency to have cracks in the crust. Handle the dough gently. After 4 hours of fermenting, preshape your dough and let it bench rest for 15 minutes.
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Then final shape your dough and place in bannetons or couche. I divide the dough into two pieces weighing approximately 1 lb 9 oz/708g each. Final proof the dough which takes about 1.5 – 2 hours and then bake in a preheated hot oven at 450F degrees on top of a baking stone.
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Make sure to preheat your oven and stone really well. Put your roasting pan lid into the oven to preheat at least 5 minutes before baking.  Turn your proofed dough out onto a peel, slash and then place the dough on top of the hot baking stone. Spray the dough once all over and cover with a hot roasting lid. Bake for 20 minutes and then remove the lid. Bake for 15 more minutes. Cool and enjoy. The smell and flavor of this bread is very satisfying.
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3 Comments

  1. January 6, 2014    

    My sister in law made my daughter a quinoa sourdough using flax as well. It came out really nice. I hope to get something up at my blog soon about it with pictures. My daughter has been grain free for a year so it is a real treat to her to have a grain/seed bread again. And it very digestible so does not bother her stomach at all.

  2. northwestsourdough northwestsourdough
    July 31, 2011    

    Hi Asfolks, the resultant blended Quinoa mix was pasty and not gelatinous. I liked working with it, it smells and tastes great in the bread. However, it does tend to make the dough weak, so you have to limit the amount.

  3. asfolks asfolks
    July 30, 2011    

    Quinoa is a great source of protein and I have used it a lot in my breads. I have always just made a seed soaker though. The red and black varieties make an especially nice looking and great tasting bread. I like your idea of grinding the quinoa, was the paste gelatinous?
    I will have to try this soon, thanks for posting!

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